The Original Check Your Change

2018 printed book on Amazon

The CYC app for iOS

The CYC app for Android

The Check Your Change App

Welcome to the original ‘Check Your Change’. Your comprehensive guide to Britain’s circulating coins (plus all other decimal coins right back to 1968) and Bank of England bank notes.

100s of pages of information, conveniently and logically organised and smart phone friendly!

People have been checking their change with the help of ‘Check Your Change’ for 53 years! The Original Check Your Change is now online and more interactive than ever before.

In the early days it was the Pounds, Shillings and Pence that people were checking. These had served as the coinage of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland for over 1000 years. The UK switched to a fully decimal system (i.e. 100 pennies to the pound instead of the previous 240 pennies or 20 shillings to the pound) in 1971. Forty-seven years and a good two or three generations later and anyone under 50 is unlikely to be familiar with anything other than decimal coinage.

Use this website to be able to quickly see what decimal coins were made, the history and information behind the events, mintage numbers and the Rotographic collectability scale. Significant new issues (with the emphasis on standard coinage rather than precious metal issues) and other related decimal coins developments will be added here.

More in-depth information can be found in the UK’s best selling coin book (which is also available in Kindle format) “Collectors’ Coins – Decimal Issues of the United Kingdom“. The book contains all the information on this website, plus a lot more, including price data for all circulation coins and current Bank of England bank notes as well as information on special proof issues and other coins that were sold rather than being circulated.

Also available is the Check Your Change app for Android and Apple devices (screenshot shown on the right), which allows users to manage their collection of UK decimal coins. It can also be upgraded to provide current values. More details here.

Problems with the site or any gremlins, please report to

The New Alphabet 10p coins

By on 23rd March 2018

Angel of the North Bond (James) Cricket Double Decker (bus) English Breakfast
Fish & Chips Greenwich Mean Time Houses of Parliament Ice Cream Jubilee
King Arthur Loch Ness (monster) Macintosh NHS Oak (tree)
Postbox Queuing Robin (bird) Stonehenge Tea
Union Flag Villages World Wide Web X – marks the spot Yeoman warder
Zebra Crossing Obverse (common to all)

The new alphabet 10p coins. I’m still waiting for mine, but I was able to borrow some in order to take pictures for the website and app. A little more information can be found here: 10p Coins in Circulation

Posted in: New UK Coins

2017 Single Metal Error £1, the Facts

By on 31st January 2018

The monometallic error £1 coins and my BU set theory Noted in the press recently (the Times first reported it on 30/1/18) there has been some exposure for the discovery and forthcoming auction of a 2017 £1 coin made of

The 2014 Trial Piece £1 coins

By on 16th January 2018

The 2014 trial £1 has now been confirmed as an authentic Royal Mint product. These coins were lent to members of the European Vending Association for testing of the basic shape. Approximately 20,000 were made and it isn’t yet known how

Error Coins, an Introduction

By on 16th December 2017

Error coins are a fascinating and still fairly non mainstream side-line to regular coin collecting. Despite the headline grabbing stories about rare and error coins you can find in your change that are worth ‘a fortune’ that the tabloid/clickbait press

Significant Updates Since the last Book

By on 5th July 2017

Bought the book this year and need a little update on the current scene? The ‘Check Your Change’ printed book was published in March 2017. Here it is on Amazon. Things can move pretty fast in the realm of decimal

The seven new £1 coin varieties (& 2 errors)

By on 17th May 2017

Revised 16/1/2018.   Everything the advanced collector needs to know about the new £1 coin, it’s varieties and known errors/mules. This page contains information on: The Seven Different £1 coin types (2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017) Two errors that have