2009 Fifty Pence FAKE KEW.

 

<- Click Here to go back to the main 50p Coins in Circulation page

Counterfeit 2009 Kew Gardens 50p coins are known to exist. The style is similar to the fake Magna Carta £2 coin and others that can regularly be purchased direct from a Chinese auction website. I always find that the eye (of the Queen) is the most obvious giveaway, as for some reason forgers often have difficulty getting the eye detail right. The forgery on this page at 7.2 grammes is also 10% lighter than a real one which should be 8 grammes. It’s diameter is also a tiny amount less than the 27.3mm that it should be.

kewfake2

Above: A real Kew Gardens 2009 50p (left) shown next to a fake. Note the wiry hair and the slightly larger lettering.

kewfake1a

Above: Fake Kew Gardens 2009 50p.

kewfakeeyea

Above: Close up of the Queen’s eye on a fake Kew Gardens 50p. Other fakes exist that are not exactly the same, but so far, all seem to have badly executed eyes (among many other inaccuracies).

kewrealeye

Above: Close up of the Queen’s eye on a real Kew Gardens 50p.

The obverse is easiest to identify as a fake. Slight differences also exist on the reverse, relating to the tower and the word ‘Kew’.

The official Check Your Change pictures (which are of a proof coin):

Commemorative 50p coin, Type 13 (info on coin type numbers here)

Obverse Type 4b (bust design by Ian Rank-Broadley):

50p2009kewobv

Reverse Type (design by Christopher Le Brun):

50p2009kewrev

Mintage for Circulation: 210,000.

<- Click Here to go back to the main 50p Coins in Circulation page

Comments

  1. jason callaghan
    29th August 2016

    Leave a Reply

    i just weighed 2 kew gardens 50p not brilliant scales 1 weighed 7.97 and the ote 8.03 one seems the heavie one more slightly worn does this ring alarm bells or is one just less circulated

    • CYC-Admin
      31st August 2016

      Leave a Reply

      Easiest way to spot the Chinese fakes is from the detail on the Queen (I find), particularly the eye area.

  2. Ben
    5th September 2016

    Leave a Reply

    I have bought a Kew Gardens proof 50p.. One of my first purchases.. It’s in a Royal Mint box.. With a COA.. It doesn’t have a serial number on the COA.. Does that simply mean it’s fake? It looks real, the eye appears to be detailed? The coin has some brown tarnish to it?
    Thanks in advance..

    • CYC-Admin
      6th September 2016

      Leave a Reply

      Serial numbers are a fairly recent sales gimmick (some people pay big money for low numbers of certain issues and anything which causes excitement like that is good for future sales), I don’t think they had them in 2009. Email pictures of it to info@rotographic.com.

  3. Richard
    16th October 2016

    Leave a Reply

    I’m a coin collector and I need to get the 50p kew gardens commemorative coin specifics as I have one that I hope to be genuine coming from eBay…. I’ve heard if the Queens neck points to the p in pence it’s real and if to the e in pence it’s fake but where it says kew if it has no lines around the word it’s real an if so it’s fake…. The coin I have coming points to the p in pence but doesn’t look as though it has the lines…. But the ones on royal mint have the lines….. What do I do?

    • CYC-Admin
      16th October 2016

      Leave a Reply

      So far I haven’t seen a convincing fake. Don’t put too much emphasis on individual things, look at the coin as a whole. The quality of the fakes (particularly the detail to the Queen) is always much poorer than the real thing. You’re right that the neck pointing to the ‘P’ is usually a good sign, but check the eye of the Queen, they never seem to be able to get that right! There are differences on the genuine coins to the lines around the KEW word, from memory I think the coins in BU packs (and proofs) have lines.

  4. barbara
    27th January 2017

    Leave a Reply

    i am a new collector of coins please help is the kew on the coin ment to have lines each side or not examples are very different

    • CYC-Admin
      27th January 2017

      Leave a Reply

      The proof coin is actually similar to the known fakes in that regard. So far (on all I have seen) the heads side of the fakes is instantly recognisable as a fake. If your not sure, send me pictures: info@checkyourchange.co.uk

  5. sam
    7th April 2017

    Leave a Reply

    i just bought a nice shiny 50p kew garden,all looks normal,apart from the neck pointing at the letter e instead of p,the weight is 8g on the dot.has 2 line near the word kew,mirror shiny coin.all looks normal.but the neck pointing to the e is a mistery.if anyone can help or have the same ,let me know thanks.

    • CYC-Admin
      7th April 2017

      Leave a Reply

      I got your email with pics, I’m afraid it’s a Chinese made forgery. Shame on the seller.

  6. Gary walker
    29th April 2017

    Leave a Reply

    Will you be able to verify if my kew gardens is a real or fake please? I seem to think it’s real I got it in my change.

    • CYC-Admin
      29th April 2017

      Leave a Reply

      It’s certainly a good sign if you got it in your change as no one is going to spend pounds of a fake one from China and then spend it – although I suppose it is possible.

  7. nabberdabber
    22nd May 2017

    Leave a Reply

    I have brought 6 kew garden coins on ebay, all FAKE!
    they use real kew garden coin in the photo`s but send a fake, have spoken with ebay and been refunded for all, but the sellers are still on ebay?
    so best advice is don’t bother with ebay to many fraudsters on there trying to make fast money!

    • CYC-Admin
      23rd May 2017

      Leave a Reply

      It certainly can be a minefield there! Sometimes it’s best to only buy coins from known dealers, but the problem there, for decimal collectors, is that many only deal with older coins.

  8. Abbie
    3rd August 2017

    Leave a Reply

    I got my kew garden 50p and I know mine aint fake and I would never buy a coin off e-bay. Don’t do it and use only Royal Mint none of the other web sites for coins are worth toffee…

    • CYC-Admin
      3rd August 2017

      Leave a Reply

      There are plenty of other good websites that sell coins. The best ones tend to be the ones that don’t simply want your money, but actually also have a genuine interest in coins and an interesting assortment on offer. To me personally the Royal Mint coin sales dept is just about marketing and selling and has turned very gimmicky. The products are generally of good quality (for what they are) but you don’t actually have much of a choice, all new UK coins are made there and they use that monopoly to squeeze out as much financial gain as possible.

Leave a Reply


You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*