About Check Your Change

Originally “Check Your Change” was a series of little booklets introduced in 1965 by the late Richard John Marles that were printed at his own Belgravia Press printing works in Torquay England. In the mid to late 1960s there was a huge new interest in coins, as at that time coins from 1816 onwards could be found in change and Britain was about to go decimal, so the old coins wouldn’t be around for much longer!

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The most popular booklet was “Check Your Change No. 1” which covered the circulating money from 1902 right up to 1965. Other books were introduced later, which included coverage for Victorian coins, 18th century coins, Irish coins, the Channel Islands and Bermuda. Decimalisation came in 1971 and the books morphed into a range of annual price guide books for collectors, printed by his company which was by then known as ‘Rotographic’ (from the printing methods of Roto-gravure and Lithographic).

The books themselves and the range of titles has evolved since then and there are currently 13 titles in print, most of which have been introduced under new ownership since 2004. The information on this website is based on the current Rotographic publication “Collectors Coins – Decimal Issues of the UK” and its aim is to provide details of all UK decimal coins, with the emphasis on those found in circulation, and in an easy to use format with cross browser (including smart phones etc) compatibility. As of February 2017 there is also an app available for Android devices which is perfect for checking your change on the go and provides details on current UK decimal coins as well as the ability to mark coins as already owned. checkyourchange.co.uk will never try to sell you coins or do anything to hype up their values.

We have no affiliation with the Royal Mint, any private mint or any other company posing as a mint. Instead of selling new coins/medallions we are happy to neutrally assist and provide information and advice on previous and current decimal coins, with honest facts on value trends and their perceived rarity.

Every care is taken to ensure the information on this website is accurate at the date it was written.

 

Comments

  1. michelle
    26th May 2016

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    I have got a 2015’battle of Britain 50p price apparently it’s not in circulation only in sets I got it in my change

  2. Leila Allan
    16th June 2016

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    Hello I have a 1976 1p coin I would like to know how much it is worth? Please

  3. Zoe Harding
    22nd September 2016

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    Hi, I have an all gold £2 coin with a dove on, in peace and goodwill written on the edge! Is it worth anything? Thanx

    • CYC-Admin
      22nd September 2016

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      Usually a bit more than face value, unless it’s in poor condition.

  4. Tammy
    16th November 2016

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    I love this Website and if you look you can find how scarce a coin is without asking directly. Thank you for all the effort you put in. Much appreciated!

    • CYC-Admin
      16th November 2016

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      Trust me, people still do ask directly! But thanks, that’s very kind of you. Get the book 😉

  5. Mark Thompson
    15th December 2016

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    Can you tell me how much the old white £5 bank notes are worth please 1 in pristine condition framed in my bedroom passed down from my father who had it passed down from his father

    • CYC-Admin
      15th December 2016

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      Depends how pristine, depends on date, depends on serial number. And it’s not really something I cover here on a website for coins post 1968 and current English bank notes.

  6. Margaret
    23rd February 2017

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    I have a 2007 1807 £2 coin without the DG next to the 1807 and the wording around the edge is upside down when the queens head is facing up while flat on a table. ? Is it worth anything

    • CYC-Admin
      23rd February 2017

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      Without the DG means it’s just a normal one for circulation and the writing can be up either way, it’s random. All of a sudden, people seem to think the orientation of the edge wording is a thing, after 34 years nobody ever noticing that it’s random and always has been.

  7. Matt
    5th March 2017

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    Hi. I have a 1971 ‘new pence’ 2p coin, however it is silver, not copper. Collected this when I was a kid and always wondered whether it was worth anything.

    • CYC-Admin
      5th March 2017

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      For some reason the 1971 2p coins are often encountered in silver colour and all that I have seen have been nickel plated. I don’t know why it was done or who did it! Obviously it would need analysis to confirm.

  8. Paul Walker
    11th March 2017

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    In neitheer of your drop down list of coins does it show the 1989 £2 coin. I have one that I bagged up in 1989. Do these have any value

    • CYC-Admin
      11th March 2017

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      I’ve added the older £2 coins to the ‘Older Decimal Coins’ menu now. All of the older £2 coins are worth more than face value to the right people.

  9. Tony
    2nd April 2017

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    Hi I have tried finding the app to gain value of coins, and my kids have been checking their money boxes after reading this online.

    They have found a 2007 £2 coin with 1807 and a chain on it, a 50p 2016 battle of Hastings, a 2015 50p Battle of Britain.

    Can they sell them for any value and any idea how as they are mega excited that they have found a fortune lol

    • CYC-Admin
      2nd April 2017

      Leave a Reply

      Perhaps they have Apple phones? It’s currently only available for Android. The coins you mention, assuming they are in normal used condition are not special I’m afraid.

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