2014 £5 Crown

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Two commemorative crowns were issued in 2014. A coin to mark 300 years since the death of Queen Anne in 1714 and a silver proof only crown to mark the first birthday of Prince George (which has been erroneously omitted from the 2015 Collectors’ Coins – Decimal Issues book!)

Commemorative £5 Coin, Type 33:

Obverse Type (bust design by Ian Rank-Broadley):

Reverse Type (design by Mark Richards):

Edge: Milled edge.

Mintage for Circulation: Not known.

Collectability/Scarcity: 1 (for scale details see here)

The story behind the design:

The obverse shows the Ian Rank-Broadley bust of the Queen. The reverse is by Mark Richards and shows Queen Anne facing left in an eighteenth century style miniature portrait format.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne,_Queen_of_Great_Britain

 

Commemorative £5 Coin, Type – omitted in error from the current printed book! (info on coin type numbers here)

Obverse Type (bust design by Ian Rank-Broadley):

crown2014PGeorgeobvw

Reverse Type (design by Edgar Fuller):

crown2014PGeorgeRevw

Edge: Milled edge.

Mintage for Circulation: None. These were struck as silver proof only (issue limit 7,500).

Collectability/Scarcity: 5 (for scale details see here)

The story behind the design:

The obverse shows the Ian Rank-Broadley bust of the Queen. The reverse by Edgar Fuller was originally used in 1953 for the Queen’s coronation, and again for the 1960 commemorative crown. It’s a nice design, but it lacks imagination that the Royal Mint should re-cycle another old design that has no actual connection with Prince George (apart from a few tenuous links contained in the paperwork description, including the fact that a long dead ancestor was also called George and had a similar coin with shields!). It’s not surprising though, as it seems that increasingly the main aim of the Royal Mint is purely financial gain, by means of selling as many different coins as they can. It’s no wonder that with so much pressure on the marketing department, that older designs are being re-used. They are, I would imagine, cheaper to produce as no fees are due to new artists and less work is required in preparing the dies.

 

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