10p Coins in Circulation

<- Click Here to go back to the other Coins in Circulation page

The original 10p was first issued in 1968 as a larger coin and was initially used alongside and was the same size as its predecimal equivalent coin, the florin (or two shillings). In 1992 the 10p was made smaller, lighter and generally more convenient. Only the smaller post 1992 10p coins shown on this page are legal tender. For the previous larger ones, see here.

Specifications are shown at the bottom of this page.

The Alphabet 10p’s (2018)

Angel of the North Bond (James) Cricket Double Decker (bus) English Breakfast
Fish & Chips Greenwich Mean Time Houses of Parliament Ice Cream Jubilee
King Arthur Loch Ness (monster) Macintosh NHS Oak (tree)
Postbox Queuing Robin (bird) Stonehenge Tea
Union Flag Villages World Wide Web X – marks the spot Yeoman warder
Zebra Crossing Obverse (common to all)

On the 1st of March 2018 the Royal Mint introduced a range of Twenty-Six ‘Quintessentially British’ 10p coins, each showing a letter of the alphabet representing a British related theme. All of the coins will eventually circulate and initially 2.6m have been made (possibly 100,000 of each, but that hasn’t been 100% confirmed yet). They are available to purchase in silver proof form for £35.00 each, which adds up to a staggering £910.00 for anyone who wants to buy them all. They are also sold for £2 each and termed ‘Early Strike Uncirculated’ which is just marketing-speak as far as I can tell, as the ‘Early Strike’ coins they supply are struck to normal circulation coin standard and are invariably covered in bag marks and exhibit a multitude of other imperfections. Initial demand was so high that recent orders of multiple coins have just been thrown in a single zip-lock bag and have been sent out to customers, picking up even more bag marks along the way – originally it was advertised that individual coins would come in individual velvet pouches, then separate small zip-lock bags.

There has also been disappointment from a lot of people about the way the Royal Mint has dealt with orders and the fact that those that ordered first (some waited hours in the website queue system on the 1st of March) don’t seem to have been getting them first. In fact I ordered two sets on the 2nd March and they still haven’t been sent out as of today, the 28th March! To add further confusion, the coins are also available from Crown Post Offices, but come in individual and more attractive packages for £4 each. Supply of the Post Office coins also seems limited and I’m still not sure if the Post Office coins for £4 each are any better, in terms of quality, than the bag-marked £2 versions available from the Royal Mint.

For those with a little patience, the cheapest way to get them all will be from change at face value or by swapping with others, e.g. on the Check Your Change Facebook group!

Interestingly, the obverse type is also new  – it shows the denomination as ‘TEN PENCE’ instead of it being featured on the reverse, I assume this is in order to provide more space on the reverse for the main alphabet themed designs.

Collectability/Scarcity: 2 (for all alphabet 10p coins)

Previous 10p types:

Obverse Type 3, used 1992 – 1997 (bust design by Raphael Maklouf):

10p1992obv

Reverse Type 3, used 1992 – 2008 (design by Christopher Ironside):

10p1992rev

Edge: Milled.

The design:

English lion, royally crowned. ‘TEN PENCE’ and ’10’ above and below.

Dates:

1992*, Mintage 1,413,455,170.
1993, None for circulation and an unknown number for sets.
1994, None for circulation, 56,945 for annual sets.
1995, Mintage 43,259,000.
1996, Mintage 118,738,000.
1997, Mintage 99,196,000

Collectability/Scarcity: 1 for the high mintage coins, 2 for 1993 and 1994 (for scale details see here)

*Minor varieties exist for 1992 dated coins concerning the shape of the rim and the alignment of letters/numbers in relation to the edge beading. A couple of types are quite rare and should be at least 3 on the Collectability/Scarcity scale, but aren’t widely collected, most people being happy to just have one of each date.

 

Obverse Type 4, used 1998 – 2008 (bust design by Ian Rank-Broadley):

10p2003obv

Reverse Type 3, used 1992 – 2008 (design by Christopher Ironside):

10p1992rev

Edge: Milled.

Dates:

1998, None for circulation and an unknown number for sets.
1999, None for circulation and an unknown number for sets.
2000, Mintage 134,727,000.
2001, Mintage 82,081,000.
2002, Mintage 80,934,000.
2003, Mintage 88,118,000.
2004, Mintage 99,602,000.
2005*, Mintage 69,604,000.
2006*, Mintage 118,803,000.
2007, Mintage 72,720,000.
2008, Mintage 9,720,000.
2009, Mintage unknown. A coin with this date and the older lion reverse shouldn’t exist! It’s a mule (a mismatch of obverse and reverse dies). Just 2 or 3 examples are known.

Collectability/Scarcity: 1 for the high mintage coins, 2 for 1998 and 1999 and 10 for the 2009 mule with the lion reverse (for scale details see here)

Minor varieties exist for 2005 (and possibly 2006) concerning the position of the digit ‘1’ in the number ’10’ and its alignment with the rim beads. Both types are believed common.

 

Obverse Type 5, used 2008 – 2015 (bust design by Ian Rank-Broadley):

10p2008dentobv

Reverse Type 4, used 2008 – date (design by Matthew Dent):

10p2008dentrev

Edge: Milled.

The design:

Top left section of the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom.

Dates:

2008, Mintage 71,447,000.
2009, Mintage 84,360,000.
2010, Mintage 96,600,500.
2011, Mintage 59,603,850.
2012, Mintage 11,600,030.
2013, Mintage 320,200,750.
2014, Mintage 490,202,020.
2015, Mintage 119,000,000.

Collectability/Scarcity (all): 1 (for scale details see here)

 

Obverse Type 6, used 2015 onwards (bust design by (Mr) Jody Clark):

10pobv

Reverse Type 4, used 2008 – date (design by Matthew Dent):

10p2008dentrev

Edge: Milled.

Dates:

2015, Mintage 91,900,000.
2016, Mintage 135,200,000.
2017, Mintage 24,500,000.
2018, Mintage not yet known.

 

Specifications for all current 10p coins:

Size: 24.5mm
Width: 1.85mm
Metal Composition 1992 – 2010: Cupro-nickel (75% copper, 25% nickel)
Metal Composition 2011 – date: Steel core plated with nickel.
Weight: 6.50 grammes

<- Click Here to go back to the other Coins in Circulation page